5 picks from Shed Photographer Rachael Talibart.

Standing Out From The Crowd by Tony Antoniou

Standing Out From The Crowd by Tony Antoniou

Tony Antoniou is a master image manipulator and I admire his dedication to his craft.  This image has been a favourite of mine for a while.  I love the simplicity of the concept, so beautifully created so that it is both realistic and painterly.

 

Waves crash in front of a backlit Portland Bill by Stephen Banks

Waves crash in front of a backlit Portland Bill by Stephen Banks

Stephen Banks is a young photographer going places.  He is already, quite rightly, achieving acclaim for his astrophotography but I wanted to share one of his other images, to show that he is by no means only an astrophotographer.  Catching the light on the waves in front of Portland Bill: magic.

 

Bells in the Mist by Kris Dutson

Bells in the Mist by Kris Dutson

Kris Dutson is an experienced and highly accomplished landscape photographer.  It is hard to do bluebells justice in pixels but in this image Kris has done just that, capturing the special atmosphere of a misty morning.

 

Stars over the Moor by Richard F Taylor

Stars over the Moor by Richard F Taylor

I am not normally a fan of star trails but I like them in this shot by Richard F Taylor.  They add a layer of mystique that seems very suited to the ancient stones in the foreground.  I also like it that Richard has chosen to incorporate the manmade lights in the distance, a subtle contrast of new, old and very old.

 

Scan0017 by Tim Edwards

Scan0017 by Tim Edwards

Tim Edwards’s shot of a timber wolf peering out from behind a tree is such a super wildlife capture. Wolves are not easy subjects, and the capture of some interesting behaviour just adds to the impact.  I also really like the off-centre composition: spot on!

The Shed Winter Show Private View.

Clink clink, go the recycled bottles, bang bang goes my sore head. What a lovely night again at the Malthouse Shed Winter Show PV.

Great to see so many of the community, Andy White, Jo Oughton, Caroline Collet, Jeanne Goodridge (mince pie maker extraordinaire!) Phil and Cass. An extra special thank you to Paula Youens and Pete Hackett for all their help in hanging the show and also to Sally Holman, the Mayor who came along too. It was a shame that some of you couldn’t make it, thank you for your messages from around the world, we had a drink in your absence!

Even though the torrential rain and blustery weather did its best to prevent us even getting to the venue, we had a wonderful evening and the work looked fantastic. It was generally said that it was our best exhibition by far which is testament to the work submitted.

I curated the show trying to highlight the most viewed/talked about images, original artwork and those images that just jump out of the screen crying out to be seen printed. The two conversations are always, WOW don’t the images look amazing mounted on aluminium and don’t they just shine when printed in large format and they do. Photography comes alive hung on a wall and of of a computer screen.

I’m particularly proud of the B/W wall. The idea began with Odile’s beautiful drawings and I wanted to show them without a glass front, just hang them from clips and let the public get up close to see the detail. The photography comprises of strong images of the Cobb, Maiden Castle and urban architecture including St Paul’s and a tenement block. There is a conversation and narrative between the work that speaks of composition and detail reduced to a range from black to white and shades of grey in between.

I hope you will be able to visit the show and support our artists and photographers. We will be here till the 5th of January only closed on Christmas day.

Ben and I have really enjoyed working with you all this year and look forward to 2014 with such optimism for our growing community and to the friendships we are sure that will deepen and to meeting new friends too.

Have a peaceful, happy Christmas and see you in the New Year!

Chelsea.

Five picks from the Shed Gallery by AOTW Rachael Talibart.

Church at Budir, Iceland by Andy White

Church at Budir, Iceland by Andy White

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I have really enjoyed seeing Andy White‘s series of images from Iceland gradually added to the Shed.  They are a striking combination of delicacy and bleakness. I like the simplicity of the subdued colours against the snow.

 

Dignified by Myles Davidson

Dignified by Myles Davidson

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Myles Davidson‘s dignified gent makes me smile- a delightfully whimsical image and a great, clean street shot.

 

Escape by Charlotte Fielding

Escape by Charlotte Fielding

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Charlotte Fielding‘s ‘Escape’ is so well titled. The interesting old canoe, just perched on the shore, invites the viewer to imagine a journey into adventure. A simple, but very evocative shot.

 

Dunnock by Joseph Oughton

Dunnock by Joseph Oughton

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Joseph Oughton‘s shot of a Dunnock is beautiful.  The light is perfect, showing off the really rather lovely plumage of this often overlooked little bird.

 

Block and lines by John Hunt

Block and lines by John Hunt

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John Hunt has a great eye for the unusual angle that creates an image out of the mundane.  This picture is a perfect example.  The low and wide point of view makes a really striking photo that would look amazing printed really large and hung on a wall.

AOTW Rachael Talibart on her photography.

What first drew you to photography? 

When I was a teenager, I was given one of those small cartridge cameras, the sort with a case than folds out to become a handle.  It took terrible photos but I didn’t know any better.  I was hooked immediately.

Cobb Cottages by Rachael Talibart

Cobb Cottages by Rachael Talibart

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What is your favourite photographic memory, and why?

I have two.  The first, from way back in the days of film, was on my honeymoon in Zimbabwe.  We went out to watch the sun set over Lake Kariba.  My husband and our guide sat watching the sunset from the jeep, sipping gin cocktails, while I crouched in the grass with my camera, getting bitten by bugs.  The shot I took of an elephant silhouetted against the sunset reflected in the lake remains one of my favourites even today.  I have lost the negatives and only have a 6×4 print but every time I see it, I smile.  (And I don’t like gin anyway.)

Storm over Nantucket by Rachael Talibart

Storm over Nantucket by Rachael Talibart

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The second is from a trip to Nantucket back in 2011, when I was lucky enough to photograph one of the most exciting storms I have ever seen.  Lightning struck pretty much without pause for two hours, and I photographed every minute of it. The ultimate photographic rush.

Dancing Poppies by Rachael Talibart

Dancing Poppies by Rachael Talibart

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Who is your favourite photographer, and why?

Such a difficult question!  I derive so much inspiration from the work of other photographers in all genres.  Lately, I have been enjoying the work of Kilian Shoenberger Every one of his images draws the viewer in, making you feel as if you were actually there, able to walk through the image’s surface and into the landscape beyond.  The rich, yet natural colours are stunning and it amazes me that this photographer is, in fact, colour blind.

What would be your ideal camera, and where would you take it?

My ideal camera would combine the power, functionality and resolution of my present DSLR (Canon 5D Mark III) with the light weight and sleek styling of my travel camera (Fuji X-E1) and a lens that zooms from 16-400mm with the same quality as a prime.  (Well, you didn’t say it had to be realistic!)  I would take it absolutely everywhere.

Tell us what you enjoy most about your own work, and what has inspired you recently. 

What I enjoy most about my photography is that I am always learning new things, about photography and about my subjects.  The day I stop doing that will probably be the day I stop taking photos.  Recently I have become a judge for the Surrey Photographic Association.  This takes me to camera clubs all over the county, and I am often impressed and moved by the images I see.  Sharing is a huge part of my enjoyment of photography and I consider it an honour to be invited to view images shared by fellow photographers.

The Road Goes Ever On by Rachael Talibart

The Road Goes Ever On by Rachael Talibart

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Do you have bursts of creativity – and when/where are you most creative?

If I could spend all my time creating images, I would.  So I suppose I am most creative whenever I can spend time on photography, and not very creative at all the rest of the time!

How do you spend a creative day? 

For me, the best part of making images takes place out in the field with my subject, whatever it may be.  I try to spend as little time at the computer

as possible.  That does not mean that I eschew photo manipulation, and I must confess I get a little tired of photographers who declare that their images are ‘straight out of camera’ as if that is a badge of honour.  It’s a bit like saying, in the days of film, that all one’s images are processed at Boots! But in the end nothing can beat, for me, the joy of simply, and quietly, waiting for the light.

Medicine for the Soul by Rachael Talibart

Medicine for the Soul by Rachael Talibart

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What are the most important elements of a successful photo?

Another hard question!  The obvious answer is: composition, composition, composition.  Having an understanding of light is also vital.  But above all, I think the photographer must feel strongly for the subject of his/her image.  That is when the magic starts to happen.

Tell us about your favourite photograph, either your own or someone else’s, and please send us a copy/link from their website.

I have so many favourite photographs.   Picking one is impossible.  So I will just choose one of the many images I have enjoyed this week, a magnificent photo of a giant wave breaking over La Jument lighthouse and the lighthouse keeper standing nonchalantly in the doorway:

Lighthouse of "la Jument" in the storm.

Lighthouse of "la Jument" in the storm - Jean Guichard

What a shot.

Stephen Banks on his favourites from the Shed Gallery.

And thus ends my artist of the week feature on The Shed. I’d like to thank Ben and Chelsea for their support and hard work in getting all my annoying technical queries sorted so quickly. Cannot wait for the Shed Winter Show in Lyme Regis and seeing my work on display.
The Shed is growing into a great community of superb artists. I’m going to stick to my roots and monstly highlight my favourite landscape photographers on here. These are people who are dedicated to getting the best shots at the best moments. They have dedication and that, above anything else, is what makes a great landscape shot in my opinion.
Kris is local to me in Dorset, being only a few miles down the road. He has taken photographs that I’m very jealous of, so I guess that’s a good indicator of good work.
Colmers Cumulus by Kris Dutson

Colmers Cumulus by Kris Dutson

His Colmers Cumulus is a something I truly admire – a shot of Colmer’s Hill as I’ve never seen it previously or since. Knowing all the angles, especially with this iconic West Dorset hill, is key to getting unique shots of a photogenic landmark that everyone will have taken a picture of in the past.
Frost on the Frome by Kris Dutson

Frost on the Frome by Kris Dutson

I also love ‘Frost on the Frome‘, because it is a typically Dorset scene in the winter, and it is something I have yet to photograph, mainly because I don’t get up early enough to see the best of the frost and sunrises. Kris merges the foreground focus of the frosty ferns and grasses, the river, and the background hills and sky beautifully.
Andy is a superb landscape photographer, who can also often be found photographing Dorset landscapes.
Dawn East Cliff West Bay by Andy White

Dawn East Cliff West Bay by Andy White

East Cliff is a special place for me, being only a mile down the road from where I live. This shot is serene and peaceful. I expect he got his feet wet in the process though!
August mist from Quarr Hill by Andy White

August mist from Quarr Hill by Andy White

It’s tempting, from Quarr Hill, to just focus on Colmer’s Hill, as it is so prominent in the scene. But if you look beyond it, especially on a cold misty morning, the lines the trees cast in the sunrise are spectacular. Andy has captured this perfectly.
Philippa’s work stood out for me during The Shed’s summer show, when I was convinced to sign up after seeing the fantastic quality of the prints. The images that featured in her ‘Escape‘ exhibition have a quiet and eerie calmness to them.
Yellow chair, Portobello by Philippa Gedge

Yellow chair, Portobello by Philippa Gedge

Away from the landscape work, I do like an image that makes you think. I was a close follower of the documentary photography course at Newport, where I studied Graphic Design. Seeing the results of the conceptual modules was always interesting. ‘Yellow chair, Portobello‘ reminds me of this sort of work. Why is that seat still there? Who would have sat in it? Why hasn’t anyone run off with it yet? It’s quite a nice seat, the scouser in me says I could give it a good home! It’s interesting to see what gets left behind when things move on…
California Chrysler by Philippa Gedge

California Chrysler by Philippa Gedge

The cars on display at The Shed’s summer show caught my eye because I’m a fan of cars, but also they have a cold and clinical charm to the way they were photographed.  California Chrysler is just one example of this. I guess the snow present in a number of the pictures adds to this, but the car is made to look big in the frame and the depth-of-field is spot on!