Prepared for Christmas?

With Christmas fast approaching now is the time to capitalise on offering YOUR artwork and photography as a special, unique gift.

Now’s the time to write a simple email to your contacts, friends and family showing them how easy it is to buy an image of yours online printed and ready to hang. Simply send an email with a link to your profile with few images attached. If you use social media post images with the link attached so if anyone clicks onto the image they go straight back to the gallery and are just a couple of clicks away to BUY. This at the end of the day is why we are putting our work out there and why shouldn’t it be your work they are going to buy.

Make EVERY tweet, instagram and facebook post count.

Branscombe Beach Winter by Paul Newman

Branscombe Beach Winter by Paul Newman

Make sure your profile is also up to date with the following:

Write a full description: However over simplistic it may seem to you is incredibly important. Also ‘Tag” your images so that they appear in the search in the gallery. Tags also help the google ‘spiders’ find your image as they crawl the web. You may know Corfe Castle is in Dorset but it doesn’t mean someone from Norfolk or Australia would. We deal with many enquiries via email and if the image isn’t well defined the client can forget which image it is or who by that they are interested in and they lose interest quickly. A great example of a well titled image is ‘Archway to Heaven’ which is memorable as well as a stunning image. If you have multiple images with the same title then edit each one to be slightly different so a client differentiate between them.

Corfe castle ancient misty castle by Shaun Jacobs

Corfe castle ancient misty castle by Shaun Jacobs

Show enthusiasm: Refresh your portfolios, show an interest in what you do. Keep your groups to no more than 15 images. If you have too many in any one portfolio the buying public lose interest and stop scrolling. Keep them well edited and short. This forces the viewing public to come back to the beginning or search for more. If you show enthusiasm in what you do this will show through your work and resonate with the buying public. You may only ever sell one image over and over again however it is the body of work around it that gives the buying public the confidence to invest in you and your story. If you have sold then keep telling your public that someone has shown confidence in your artwork by hanging it on the wall.

A walk in the woods by Tom Hard

A walk in the woods by Tom Hard

Be generous: Engage with other photographers praise and share their work, ask advice and you’ll see how encouraging their response is. Ask questions about your own work, this is your free ‘market research’. Buy samples to decorate your home or office or give your work as a gift this Christmas or secret Santa. It will be the start of many conversations ‘Wow where can I buy that’ ‘I didn’t know you were a photographer’.  Small A4 prints on aluminium make lovely ‘ Christmas cards’ that will then be propped up on mantelpieces or kitchen windows and kept far beyond the season.  Photography cries out for being printed in large format. Our most popular sizes that we sell are 60cm x 90cm and they look stunning and elegant on aluminium which is waterproof, UV resistant and the modern way to show photography, what’s not to like in your sales pitch!

A Winter West Bay Walk by nathalie roberts

A Winter West Bay Walk by nathalie roberts

Over the next few weeks we will be highlighting some of our most viewed and best selling images from our gallery over the past year.

Artist of the Week, Lorraine Poole.

What first drew you to photography?

My first memory I have of photography was when I was 8 or 9 and my Dad let me take some pictures on his black and white polaroid camera.  I was amazed at the magic of being able to capture images that I could hold in my hands.  It wasn’t long before I had my own camera – a Kodak Brownie 127. The thrill of collecting my prints was wondrous, the torture of waiting for my negatives to get printed was excruciating and the cost well that was very limiting to say the least.  So when I grew up I ended up working for over 20 years in the voluntary sector, finally realising my goal as CEO.  However, I was taken suddenly ill over 3 years ago and rediscovered my creative self and love of photography which also became my therapy to recovery.

What is your favourite photographic memory, and why?

I won my first photography competition at the age of 11. I took a photo of a beautiful pink and red sunset while hanging out of my bedroom window. But my favourite? Now that is difficult but I’d say taking photographs of music legend Robert Plant playing live was fun.  Shooting Big Big Train, Francis Dunnery, Deborah Rose and friends performing at a charity concert last year and having my images chosen to use on social media – so exciting. Having my images exhibited, and purchased even and of course being chosen by Canon to feature in their online showcase on the theme of Portraits.

Who is your favourite photographer, and why?

Henri Cartier-Bresson, George Hurrell, Richard Avedon and Dorothea Lange are just some of the photographers who have inspired my love of black and white photography (which I prefer mostly these days). Though worlds apart their stylish images reflect the times they lived in staying true to their own style and vision. Another of my favourite photographers is Andy Rouse. I have had the pleasure of meeting Andy, he is so down to earth; I respect him for his energy, compassion for animals and shooting (in the best way) the most amazing wildlife photographs. He now shoots Canon and facilitates awesome photo safaris (though sadly far too expensive for me). I also don’t take myself too seriously and always have fun with my photography.

What would be your ideal camera, and where would you take it?

I currently adore the camera I am using right now, the Canon EOS 6D. It’s relatively light compared to many other full frame cameras and easier for me to use.  Due to pain and weakness in my wrists and arms due to a chronic illness my camera has to be comfortable for me and not too bulky or weighty. The quality it gives me is great and is surprisingly portable and versatile.

Tell us what you enjoy most about your own work, and what has inspired you recently.

I love the endless creative possibilities. Photography to me is very much an art form that allows me to create quirky, abstract, thought provoking, beautiful (or not), personal views of the world as I see it. The bonus being that somebody else may also appreciate or even like my images too.

My nosey nature fuels my love of people watching and I especially enjoy street photography. It is so unpredictable and challenging but amazing to capture a candid view of a moment in time of real life as it happens. I recently visited my son in Nottingham and walking through the city centre I noticed a striking ad poster that looked like the model was reaching for the telephone while a young man walks by looking at his mobile phone.

Hanging on the Telephone by Lorraine Poole

Hanging on the Telephone by Lorraine Poole

Do you have bursts of creativity – and when/where are you most creative?

Yes, very much so but it can also depend on my health at the time.  Bursts of creativity can come from anywhere.  I often see things out and about that spark my curiosity and entice me to find out more, and capture the object/person/moment in time. I rarely go out with a plan of knowing what I am looking for and what I want to shoot.  Though I do have images in my head that I would like to create, I end up going out with my camera and coming across a subject/opportunity as a matter of chance.  An example of this would be when I traveled down to Lyme Regis to see the Instant Exhibition and meet Chelsea for the first time.  While I was there it was a beautiful sunny day and so I took a walk around the town (with my parents).  Close to the Mill I saw a small building that looked dark and mysterious inside.  Being inquisitive I walked through the open door and came across a wonderful pottery workshop and met a lovely potter there who allowed me to take photographs of him putting the finishing touches to a number of mugs he had just made. I never use flash but used what light there was and shot a series of ‘portraits’.  I later processed these in black and white which worked well to contrast the differing textures of the artisan potter, the fascinating workspace and challenging light.

Potter in Lyme Regis, Dorset by Lorraine Poole

Potter in Lyme Regis, Dorset by Lorraine Poole

How do you spend a creative day?

If I am awake there is a strong possibility, I am finding something to photograph! I am also a big fan of the camera on my iPhone 6 plus so there’s no stopping me. I am a nightmare to go a walk with because I am always seeing things I have to stop and snap. Because I can have problems with my mobility I have become good at finding wonderful flora and fauna to shoot in my tiny garden.  Have also been having fun experimenting with macro and trying to capture the stunning beauty of the smallest things.  Nature is another love of mine and I am extremely lucky to live in the country at the edge of the New Forest. As an amateur photographer I am also continuously editing and looking at my photographs with a view to building up a portfolio and one day hosting my own exhibition. Apart from daydreaming my day also consists of talking to my husband and dogs and eating chocolate.

What are the most important elements of a successful photo?

What is a successful photo? Photography as is art is extremely subjective.  Winners of photo contests – I rest my case. To me the lighting is important, the image should encourage a response or emotion. Technical excellence to me is not everything as I will often choose to shoot images out of focus, soft, grainy and dark to add to the overall feel and mood. It is important to me to stay true to who I am as an artist. A successful photo to me is one that I am really happy with and in turn contributes to my confidence and learning.

Tell us about your favourite photograph, either your own or someone else’s.

I couldn’t possibly choose one photo but Richard Kalvar’s high contrast black and white street shots are some of my favourites.

One of my own favourites is a portrait of Robert Plant on stage.  I really wanted to capture a classic shot of his powerful performance, an image of energy and realness. Processing in black and white gives it that classic rock feel.

Robert Plant on Stage by Lorraine Poole

Robert Plant on Stage by Lorraine Poole